Lovable local dry goods – Vancouver Island Salt & Saskatchewan Quinoa by Grain

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

 

Eating local is not all about produce and protein. Sometimes, the most pleasant surprise comes in the form of a locally produced dry good you may never have considered was locally available. 

 

Here are two beautiful, Canadian products which not only boast lower carbon footprints than their imported counterparts, but they also give you a different look at some familiar staples. 

 

Canadian Golden Quinoa by Grain

If you don’t think that you like quinoa, it’s probably because you have only experienced other varieties. The usual white commercial quinoa tends to get mushy. This can make it hard to use because the texture and flavour are working against you.

 

Golden quinoa is a much different product. When cooked, it retains a nice tooth. While it’s not exactly crunchy, neither does it get mushy by the time it’s cooked through. In that sense, the texture is reminiscent of red quinoa.

 

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

 

At the same time, golden quinoa also has a pleasant, nutty flavour. The flavour and aroma are distinct from that of red quinoa, even though the textures are similar. Canadian farmers have been cultivating their unique brand of golden quinoa for years, resulting in a product which cooks and eats like no grain you have ever tasted.

 

 

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

 

Because it remains fluffy when cooked, golden quinoa substitutes perfectly for cous cous. Not only is this a high protein alternative with a lower glycemic load, but its nutty flavour adds an earthy dimension that cous cous never would.

 

Vancouver Island Sea Salt

 

When you taste this salt, you taste the west coast. If you have ever gone swimming in the ocean here, you will recognize its flavour in this sea salt.

 

One of the first things you will notice about Vancouver Island sea salt is that it appears clumpy. Its texture is due to the unique profile of nutrients found in British Columbia’s waters. When you harvest sea salt, those delicious impurities remain in the salt and leave it feeling almost like wet sand.

 

 

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah

 

 

So, while it does not pour like ordinary table salt, neither does it taste like ordinary salt. You can almost taste the entire coastline, kelp-lined shores, and dark green waters of British Columbia. A few grains on your tongue and you have the taste of a summer day, emerging from the ocean after dunking your head below the waves.

 

This also makes it the perfect choice for seasoning some of our beautiful local seafood. What better to season a fresh salmon fillet than salt extracted from the very water where it swam? Its unique, briny character also pairs well with vegetables and fits into almost any savoury application. 

 

You can find these products in our Kitchen Sink new home gift basket (below)

 

Kitchen Sink - New home gift basket

 

 

You can play with these dry goods and make the delicious seasonal entree below: [Recipe] Canadian Quinoa Stuffed Squash with Sage Brown Butter

Photo Credit: Photography By Leah